Soil Tilth and Organics for Water Conservation

Adapting to a changing climate will be one of the key factors to the future success of agriculture. Water conservation in farm settings should start with building the capacity of the land to capture and retain precipitation. Improving tilth and adding organic matter to soils are effective tools for water management. Enhancing water capture and storage in the soil can be a cost-effective solution to minimizing drought impacts in dryland farming.

This video presentation was the final of three that I made to the 2020 Water Management Strategies for Dryland Agriculture Webinar Series. The webinar series was sponsored by the BC Agriculture and Food Climate Action Initiative. It was delivered as part of their regional adaptation program.

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Agroforestry for Water Conservation

Water Conservation

Adapting to a changing climate will be one of the key factors to the future success of agriculture. Water conservation in farm settings should start with building the capacity of the land to capture and retain precipitation. Agroforestry methods have been proven as effective tools for water management. Enhancing water capture and storage in the soil can be a cost-effective solution to minimizing drought impacts in dryland farming.

This video presentation was the second of three that I made to the 2020 Water Management Strategies for Dryland Agriculture Webinar Series. The webinar series was sponsored by the BC Agriculture and Food Climate Action Initiative. And, was delivered as part of their regional adaptation program.

Continue reading “Agroforestry for Water Conservation”

Agriculture and the Water Cycle

Water Conservation

Adapting to a changing climate will be one of the key factors to the future success of agriculture. Water conservation in farm settings should start with building the capacity of the land to capture and retain precipitation. Building soil tilth with organics, as well as, using agroforestry methods, are proven tools for water management. Enhancing water storage in the soil can be a cost-effective solution to minimizing drought impacts in dryland farming.

This video presentation was the first of three that I made to the 2020 Water Management Strategies for Dryland Agriculture Webinar Series. The webinar series was sponsored by the BC Agriculture and Food Climate Action Initiative. And, was delivered as part of their regional adaptation program.

Continue reading “Agriculture and the Water Cycle”

Getting Started in Agroforestry: Part 6, Support

Agroforestry support, or lack thereof, continues to be a bit of a barrier and disadvantage to using agroforestry practices. This is slowly starting to change as agroforestry, and particularly silvopasture, gains traction as climate change strategy for food production.

All the same though, for both those new to agroforestry, and those not so new. The key to happy future is probably best summed by up Barry Schwartz: keep your expectations low.

If you’ve read this entire series, chances are you have more questions now than before you started. But, that is okay. You should now have the right questions to guide your agroforestry planning. This last article will help guide you to know which questions to answer by yourself, and which questions to seek out others to answer.

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Getting Started in Agroforestry: Part 5, Production System

Designing an agroforestry production system to fit your goals can be an excercise in frustration.

Firstly, agroforestry can become complex because of the large number of moving parts. Your focus should therefore, be to design for outcomes, not unnecessary complexity.

Secondly, agroforestry is plagued by a word-storm of terminology. This can leave you feeling great if you are trying to build up your Scrabble vocabulary. But, otherwise it just creates unneccesary confusion for newcomers.

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